Wednesday
Jan062016

Приговор Ыкласу Кабдуакасову

Tuesday
Feb102015

Washington DC Special Roundtable Consultation, Feb 4 2015. Documents

Thursday
Nov222012

Azerbaijan: International Religious Freedom Report for 2011

Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor

The constitution provides for religious freedom; however, other laws and policies restricted religious freedom in practice. Most religious groups met without government interference; however, authorities reportedly monitored and raided some religious services, confiscated religious materials, and harassed and detained some members of Muslim and Christian groups. The government considers some of these groups “nontraditional” because they lack a long history in the country. There are also burdensome registration requirements for religious groups that the government enforced. Legislation passed during the year increased restrictions on religious groups. However, in practice, the government did not demonstrate a trend toward either improvement or deterioration in respect for and protection of the right to religious freedom.

There were reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious affiliation, belief, or practice. There was occasional hostility toward groups that proselytized, particularly Jehovah’s Witnesses, evangelical Christians, and other missionary groups.

As part of its overall policy to promote and defend religious freedom, the U.S. government discussed religious freedom with the government, various nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and religious leaders. 

To read the full report

Thursday
Nov222012

Uzbekistan: International Religious Freedom Report for 2011

Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor

The constitution and laws provide for religious freedom; however, other laws and policies restrict religious freedom and, in practice, the government generally enforced these restrictions. The government did not demonstrate a trend toward improvement in respect for and protection of the right to religious freedom. The law restricts the religious freedom of unregistered groups and prohibits many activities, such as proselytizing; many members of minority religious groups faced heavy fines and short jail terms for violations of these laws. The government continued to deal harshly with Muslims who discussed religious issues outside of sanctioned mosques. However, the government did not interfere with worshippers at sanctioned mosques and permitted the regular operation of religious groups traditionally practicing in the country, including the Muslim, Jewish, Catholic, and Russian Orthodox communities.

There were reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious affiliation, belief, or practice. However, society generally was tolerant of religious groups, and religious groups were generally tolerant of each other.

U.S. government representatives engaged with the government on religious freedom as part of a broader dialogue on respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. Embassy officials met with representatives of religious communities, civil society, and government bodies, as well as relatives of prisoners, to discuss freedom of conscience and belief. The U.S. ambassador hosted an iftar dinner (an evening meal during Ramadan) for representatives of a number of religions. The secretary of state redesignated Uzbekistan as a Country of Particular Concern (CPC) under the International Religious Freedom Act on August 18, for having engaged in or tolerated particularly severe violations of religious freedom. 

To read the full report

Wednesday
Nov212012

To the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE)

Dear ,

It is with great concern that I am writing to you this letter, which attempts to describe yet another worrying trend in the treatment of the tiny Christian minority in Uzbekistan.

Cases of persecution of members of the Christian community in Uzbekistan are mounting daily. However, it does not seem that the mainstream, and indeed non-mainstream, media are keen to pay worthy attention to the alarming events taking place in this country.

The real problem underlying the vast majority of these events is linked to the Uzbek Government’s efforts to construct court cases against the members of the Christian minority in a way, which looks legitimate and lawful. The police and criminal justice system of the country are being used to bring innocent Christians before its courts, which are well-known for their bias and implicit dependence on the government.

(See Attachment A)

As a general overview, religious freedom of Christians in Uzbekistan is one of the most difficult issues in the country’s predominantly Muslim environment, where only two mainstream religions – Orthodox Christianity and Judaism – are recognized and seemingly tolerated by the country’s traditional society. Despite the fact that the Constitution of the Republic of Uzbekistan asserts that “democracy in the Republic of Uzbekistan shall be based upon common human principles, according to which the highest value shall be the human being, his life, freedom, honor, dignity and other inalienable rights”, the Uzbek government made every effort to restrict not only religious freedoms, but also freedom of speech and press, the right to assembly.

The situation for the Uzbek Christians is not safe. Authorities have started to tighten their grip on all churches. Societal hostility and resentment against them is growing, fanned by negative TV reports and publications. For these reasons, teaching their believers is an increased challenge for local pastors. The situation gradually spirals out of control.

Could you please take notice of this letter and help me in my troublesome efforts to alleviate lives of many Christians in Uzbekistan. 

Some examples of the persecution

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